Homeschooling High School: Finding the Best Curriculum

One very common question among homeschoolers is “where do I find the best curriculum?”

There is not one curriculum that’s the best. There is only the curriculum that’s the best fit for your child. This is why I don’t think anybody can tell you what the best curriculum is, because it may not fit your child at all. So, one of the things you want to be thinking about is what has worked for your in the past because that’s the kind of thing that’s likely to be a successful curriculum in the future.

The other thing you want to be thinking about, especially during the high school years, is whether the curriculum was made for homeschoolers. The reason this is important is because there’s a lot of curriculum out there, even sold at homeschool conventions, that was originally developed for public and private high school teachers. These books assume that you are in a classroom setting and includes lots of repetition. It also assumes that the teacher knows the subject. This means if you were to buy a French book that was intended for a public school French teacher, it would assume you know French.

In contrast, if you buy curriculum that is intended and written for homeschoolers, it’s going to assume that you know nothing. It will assume that you don’t know the subject and that your child doesn’t know the subject. This is how you get through, especially those difficult subjects like chemistry, physics or algebra. You will want to choose a curriculum that is made for homeschoolers and this will help you be much more successful.

I have a suggestion for you if are looking for curriculum for the very first time and you have no idea where you are going to start or what you are going to do. Usually, I point people to Sonlight curriculum because I find that it has the best hand-holding and can help you kind of ease in to a homeschool curriculum a little bit. So, if you are completely flummoxed and you don’t have a clue where to start, look at Sonlight curriculum. Other than that just make sure that your curriculum choices are made for homeschoolers.

Diversity in Education and Curriculum Concepts – Book Review

Are you interested in a future in teaching, education administration, or becoming a social worker, or school psychologist, then there is a book, which I’d like to recommend that your read, and then I’d like to give you a more than fair assessment of this work.

“Multicultural Education in a Pluralistic Society,” by Donna M. Gollnick and Philip C. Chinn, Pearson Merrill a Prentice Hall Company, Upper Saddle River, NJ, (2006), pp. 404, ISBN: 0-13-119719-3.

This book was quite interesting to me, and its first publishing was in 1983 and it has been upgraded and republished every few years since. I felt as if the book was very hard to use because it has the Preface prior to the table of contents, which makes navigating very tough. The preface is quite good and explains how the book is formatted.

Once into the book it is very easy to follow along, even the most blithering idiot could use this book and understand it, perhaps, that is their target reader; at least this is the impression I got, and speaking of impression, I believe this book is trying to brainwash the “education student” who has an impressionable mind, this is my opinion based on reading it.

Indeed, as a coordinator for a think tank online I was really worried that such books are indeed being used to train and teach new teachers and college professionals, and students who will go into the educational profession as administrators, professors, psychologists, etc. There are chapters on social classes, race, homosexuality, diversity, gender, religion, and age. There are sub-chapters such as; Hate Groups

Racial Identification

Bullying

Self Esteem

Sexual Harassment

Anyway, you get the idea of what this wonderful book is all about, unfortunately after reading through it all, I decided I really didn’t have room on my many book shelves for it. And I chose not to donate it to a Thrift Store, and I failed to put it into the recycle bin – it has gone straight into the trash. But, I think this is a great book for a neo-liberal-socialist. And I recommend that you read this book so you can understand how all this political correctness has permeated in our society and how it started in academia.

This book also had everything reiterated and duplicated on a CD ROM with videos, and roll-playing on each chapter. I suppose this is for those in academia who cannot read well, and yet, might still be teaching our children and kids. Look, anyone who is serious about teaching needs to understand how it all works, and what it’s all about, even if you disagree with every single aspect of it. This is why I read the book, and duly discharged to where I believe it belongs. Please consider this.

Abeka Homeschool Curriculum – An Honest Look at the Pros and Cons

Abeka homeschool curriculum is a K-12, accredited, Christian based homeschooling program that uses teaching techniques that are similar to those used in traditional schools. A Beka Book was founded in 1954 and is a still a favorite among Christian schools. The company’s use of textbooks and workbooks makes it a popular choice among parents who want to make sure their children remain on par with their peers in Christian and public schools.

Abeka homeschooling materials are colorful, thorough and easy to use, making it a good fit for families who are new to homeschooling. The company provides workbook pages that children can use independently, and teacher’s manuals that tell parents exactly what to say and do during instruction time. Parents can also purchase flashcards, charts and games that are scheduled in the lesson plans, along with answer keys for checking workbooks and tests. The company offers a full range of academic subjects. Materials can be purchased separately or as part of a kit.

Although A Beka is more expensive than similar programs on the market, it provides a high-quality education that usually places children a grade level above their public school peers. The company’s lesson plans and other materials can be saved and reused with younger siblings. Because Abeka is a popular program, materials that are well kept can usually be easily resold.

Some homeschoolers have complained that Abeka is too structured, too time-consuming, and too much like having school at home. However, as with any curricula, the program can be adapted to meet a family’s needs. In our home, we only use Abeka for math, phonics and language arts. We slow down or speed up as needed, and eliminate unnecessary activities. We also add in books, projects and field trips to make our program more fun.

Abeka generally works well for children with visual and auditory learning styles who learn in a traditional manner. It may not be a good fit for kinesthetic or hands-on learners. In addition, because the program moves at a rapid pace, it may not be suitable for children with special needs or learning disabilities.

Families who choose to use Abeka homeschool curriculum can use the parent-directed program that allows them to purchase materials to use on their own, or the fully accredited option, where A Beka Academy generates report cards and transcripts for the student. The company also has a DVD program which brings high-quality teaching into the home. In my opinion, the non-accredited, parent-directed option allows more flexibility. Families that live in states that do not have strict homeschooling requirements should have no problem taking this route.

Before purchasing materials from A Beka Book, view samples at the company’s website or attend a hotel meeting at a location near you.