Home Schooling – Why Do It?

Many people look at home schoolers and wonder how and why they do it. Some people think home schooling is a hassle and think “why don’t you just send your kids to school so they can be taught by a professional?” It all depends on your world view.

If you believe that you don’t have as much to offer your child as a teacher does, then you will think that home schooling is not for you. Actually home schooling can be a positive experience for both parent and child. The parent gets to do some soul searching deciding to take on this endeavor and the student has the benefits of individualized attention and curriculum.

Homeschooling is legal in most states and can be done without fear of doing something illegal as it was at the beginning of the home school movement or in many countries today. We have a tremendous privilege to be able to choose how and what our child learns. There are many people in other countries who would love to home school their children, but are just not allowed to.

Choosing how and what your child learns can be seen as a huge burden and responsibility, but actually can be very rewarding. When you pay attention to what your child likes and how he learns best and then you find a system of learning that you both can live with, true learning takes place. Most school classrooms can’t offer the individualized curriculum that home schooling offers. You can’t just take your children out of school and let them play, but playing games and creating projects can teach your child many valuable skills.

When you examine what you truly believe about education and learning and trust the fact that this child was given to you to teach and enjoy, then you can move towards home schooling with confidence.

Home Schooled Curriculums – Homeschool Reviews

If you are thinking about homeschooling your children there are some basic things you should know about the benefits of homeschooling Below I explain some of the options you have when home schooled your kids.

I’d like to tell you about the benefits of homeschooling and selecting a home schooled curriculum. Now the best way to select a curriculum is to actually look at homeschool reviews and in order to do this you really need to find a nearby home schooled curriculum store so that you can look at the benefits of homeschooling materials, you can put it in your hands and see if home schooled is going to work for you. If you can’t do that you need to find a resource catalog of the benefits of homeschooling, there are many online that you can order for free or you can just go to their websites and they’ll give you homeschooled reviews of the different products.

Now there are basically two types of home schooled curriculums, One which will hold your hand and help you do everything and then there are those that are more independent. The hand holding type tells you exactly what to do, it will include the materials that you need to read, it will have the worksheets, the tests, the answer keys, and it will even tell you what to say when you’re teaching. Examples of these are Abecca or Bob Jones or some of the dvd or video curriculums. The disadvantages of these is that they can be rather expensive and actually that’s probably the worst, it could get kind of boring a little bit if you like to be more adventurous you might feel stifled.

The independent home schooled curriculums will give you guidelines and then you decide where to go from there. An example is unit studies such as patchwork primers and these will give you a guideline to follow. You select the books from the library or books that you already have and then you teach it in the way that you see fit. You can make up your own home schooled worksheets or tests, or you may decide that you don’t need worksheets or tests. It’s all up to you and the advantage to this is going to be much less expensive, but it’s going to require more work and a little bit more time on the part of the teacher to get all the benefits of homeschooling.

Home Schooling in Your Motorhome

At first glance the terms “hitting the road” and “hitting the books” might appear mutually exclusive. But if you home school your children and have access to a motor home, read on.

Your one room school house on wheels.

One of major concerns of parents who decide to home school their children is that their child is not exposed to the wide array of mental stimuli encountered by children who participate in a more conventional education. Children who go to public and even private schools are exposed to many different cultures, personalities and diverse beliefs. However, children schooled in the home sometimes are not exposed to a wide variety of other children. Co-operative home schooling, which brings a number of families together to share the work in educating their children, helps somewhat but home schooled children still, may not experience the plethora of mental stimuli experienced by their more traditionally schooled counterparts. One way to ensure that your child has access to these stimuli is to pack up your motor home and hit the road.

Math Class

As you head down the highway in your one room school house on wheels, opportunities for teaching abound. In addition to the regular daily lesson plan, you can incorporate trip specific lessons into the daily work. For example, the math lesson begins when you stop at the neighborhood filling station to top off your tank. Consult the owners’ manual of your motor home and find out the capacity in gallons of your fuel tank. If age and grade appropriate have your young student convert this measurement from gallons to liters. For younger children, a fun activity is to let them watch the pump through the RV window and count the gallons or even tenths of gallons that pour into your motor homes fuel tank. Of course with the current price of gasoline, this activity will be much more fun for them than for you.

Once you’ve filled your tank, get out the map and sit with your student to study your route. Consult your motor home’s manual again and find how many miles per gallon you can expect to get. Help your young student compose a formula to find how far down the planned route you’ll be able to travel before your motor home requires fuel again. You can help your child use the map to help navigate as you travel along. Plan a side trip at the spur of the moment. Ask your child to tell you how this side trip will affect your timetable and fuel bill?

History Lessons.

Plan your trip so that you follow an historical route. Follow the Trail of Tears, maybe the Oregon Trail. Travel the dusty path the cowboys rode in cattle drives from Texas to Dodge City, Kansas. If you’ve got the time, follow the route of Lewis and Clark or, explore the vast expanse of the Louisiana Purchase. What ever path you choose to follow, make sure you have plenty of supplemental materials for your young student to study. Many motor home parks have high speed internet available to their campers. At the end of each day, have your child connect to the Internet and gather information about the history of the places you’ve visited.

Social Studies

Take a trip through Appalachia. Venture some distance from the Interstate into the heart of some small town. Stop at a small store or local diner. Observe the people who live and work there. Listen to their accents or, eavesdrop on a conversation. There is no better way to discover how other people live than to explore these microcosms of America. You might even want to contact local parents who also home school their children and arrange a visit to learn more about each other and compare home school curriculums.

Other Destinations

Many home schooling co-operatives hold events at various motor home parks to compare and refine home school curriculums and provide new experiences for their home schooled students. An Internet search for these home school meet ups will yield many entertaining and informative events. If you choose to make one of these trips, be prepared to have a good time and be sure to bring your favorite covered dish.

Exercises such as these are entertaining and exciting to your child and if properly presented, your young student may not even realize he is in school. But remember, as entertaining, exciting and educational as these road exercises are, they are not a replacement for the well planned curriculum and lesson plans available to parents home schooling their children.