Teaching Online – Home Schooling Book Review

If you are considering teaching online, or if you are a homeschooling parent and would like to have your kids learn online while at home then maybe you need to do a little bit of research. Maybe you need to consider what’s out there, and the various hybrid courses and technology issues which surround the world of Internet courses and online teaching.

The other day, there was a very interesting article in the Wall Street Journal that discussed why there never needed to be any poor weather days that prevented school. If the inclement weather was so bad that the school buses couldn’t run, or the blizzard made it impossible to get to school, then each student could learn at home on their own computer. The article made some compelling arguments, and I found similar points of contention in a book on the subject.

In fact, I’d like to go out of my way right now to recommend this book to you, and it is a book that I do own of my personal library. The name of this book is; “Teaching Online – A Practical Guide” (College Teaching Series – Second Edition) by Susan Ho and Steve Rossen, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, MA, (2004), 339 pages, ISBN: 0-618-29848-7.

There is a great overview of online teaching and what it’s about, and although it is written from the perspective of the institutional educator, it surely helps parents understand what they are dealing with when they choose which courses, online syllabuses, and information they wish their children to read and learn. Teaching in an online classroom is not easy, but those that have the skill and talent to pull it off, are the most desired and sought after instructors.

Why not pick up a copy of this book so you can familiarize yourself with low-tech and high-tech solutions used in Internet education. You can also find discussion forums where you can interact with teachers, and how they use whiteboards, chatting features, and instant messaging to make the online classroom feel at home. Why not learn what the teachers go through when they put together their training programs, and how they prepare themselves for their students.

It seems to me as a parent I want to know how the online teaching system works, what type of software and hardware works the best, and how the teachers are going to interact with my kids. You need to know these things up front, it’s very important, and that’s why a recommend this book to you. Indeed I hope you will please consider all this and think on it.

Creative Home Schooling for Gifted Children by Lisa Rivero

“We home school, in the words of Annemarie Roeper, to educate for life rather than simply to educate for success.”

In the aftermath of the 911 bombings, when Lisa Rivero was finishing writing this book, realization came to her of exactly how profound of a statement this actually was. She says, “I began to understand on a new level. We don’t learn about architecture or read great books or study world countries in order “to home school.” We home school so that we’re free to learn about life in its unpredictable complexity. We home school to ask questions and to seek answers for ourselves, to put ourselves in another’s place, to begin to forge new connections and relationships for a new global community, to do our small part as citizens of the world.”

Says author, David H. Albert, author of “And the Skylark Sings with Me: Adventures in Homeschooling and Community-Based Education, “Giftedness, whether of the intellectual or other varieties, exists on a continuum like most other characteristics.”

Parents of gifted children face unique challenges that are seldom discussed or taken seriously by other parents or school personnel,” says Lisa. “While parents should not become preoccupied with a child’s potential nor should they organize the entire family around the gifted child, it is extremely beneficial for parents to be aware of:

(1) why their children seem different, and

(2) that the difference is real and necessitates unique parenting and educational approaches.

I cannot adequately describe the relief I felt when I finally met other parents who, like me, were accused of being pushy when their young children taught themselves to read before school age, or who felt helpless as they watched their child’s extreme and painful sensitivity, or who struggled to keep up with the reasoning powers of a six-year-old asking a question a minute.”

This book, and its 400 pages, is a wealth of information! Chapters cover subjects such as: Traits of Giftedness, Social and Emotional Needs, Intellectual Needs, Learning Styles – Learning With a Difference, Creating Your Home School Approach, Your Creative Home School Toolbox, and chapters on Paperwork, Documentation, & Testing, Special Topics, plus so much, much more.

In her book are also sections on Resources for Gifted Children, References, publishers who offer curriculum for gifted students, websites to help parents of gifted children, software companies, and more. If you think your child is gifted, or you are looking for support in educating your gifted child, then I would seriously recommend that you check into owning this book. I believe that you can glean a lot from it!

A School To Come Home To By Lisa Dunlop

If you’re a homeschooled teen, or a parent of a home schooled teen, then this book may be of interest to you. Or maybe… you’re a teen who has been in a public or private school, and now your parent is considering homeschooling you? And just think, what if it was your junior year of high school no less?? And what if it meant leaving your longtime school friends?? In this book, Lisa Dunlop writes a story about a girl, named Elizabeth, in just this situation. Lisa herself was homeschooled for 9 years, and is currently taking college correspondence courses. She lives with her mother, father, brother and two cats in Tampa, FL.

As explained in the book, “Throughout Lisa’s years of homeschooling she has watched the many changes which new homeschooled teens go through, often from surly, mistrustful teens to happy, talkative young adults. Her desire to help homeschoolers led her to writing this book in the hope it will encourage both parents and teens.”

This is an easy book to read of only 107 pages, which is interesting, and truly does encourage any teen that may be looking at possibly homeschooling in their future. In her book, Lisa also has given her address for anyone who would like to contact her to ask her questions, or to have her speak at their curriculum fair, seminars, or homeschool meetings.

Homeschooling your teens can be one of the best things you can ever do for them!!!! One day they’ll thank you!